Risen

Risen

The Photograph

Let us pray...

Introduction:

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Current: Danbury, CT, United States
Welcome! A few years ago, I discovered an application that artists employ in their works to bring cultural awareness to their audiences. Having discerned this semiotic theory that applies to literature, music, art, film, and the media, I have devoted the blog, "Theory of Iconic Realism" to explore this theory. The link to the publisher of my book is below. If you or your university would like a copy of this book for your library or if you would like to review it for a scholarly journal, please contact the Edwin Mellen Press at the link listed below. Looking forward to hearing from you!

Thank you for visiting. I hope you will find the information insightful. ~ Dr. Jeanne Iris



To view my page on the Edwin Mellen Press website, please click below:

08 March, 2011

'60 Minutes' Story on Homeless Families and Iconic Realism (Click this title to view another story on this topic from United Way)

Map showing percentage of homeless families across the U.S.A. from:  http://cflhomeless.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/florida-map.jpg

The weekly television program, "60 Minutes," aired a story examining the background of a few homeless families near Disney World in Orlando, Florida, this past Sunday evening, 6 March. This media production is an excellent example of iconic realism. Situated in central Florida, Disney World's theme has been "The happiest place on the planet." However, just a few miles down the road from the fantasy land dwells the harsh reality of the declining U.S. economy. Families have had to make the painful decision to move into hotels that would normally be housing temporary visitors of the vacation capital. Now, these hotels have become 'home' for the many families.

The iconic theme park juxtaposed to this American tragedy brings awareness of the cultural need for United States citizens to creatively invent ways to help these neighbors return to their jobs or begin new ones in an effort to experience their unalienable rights, outlined in the Declaration of Independence: "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness."

2 comments:

  1. Dear Jeanne: Iconic realism sounds like a juxtaposition of philosophical extremes. Wondering if the concept mates the ideal with the real. This schism of opposites which works or does not work in harmony depending on the level of extreme or gap between the either/or conscious or subconscious activity, or any opposite belief system. In the 60 Minute expose, the dream versus reality, Disneyworld versus All life outside the cloistered toon fantasy world. All of the patterned implications of iconic realism points to (in the 60 minutes interview) how such extremes throughly determine the point of contact with concept versus actuality of said concept. As thought patterns intiate and indicate the iconic world of thought in its pure form and then realized (realism) in the trickle-down effect of the initial perception(icon) made concept made construct. This bringing into focus the idea and/or ideal with intent to create the unseen except in the realm of thought vision versus actualized visual experience in the realm of real. So finally these thoughts are brought down to the actualized pattern of thought made tridimensional and are now actualized as "hard copy" a real, tangible physical thing. This evocation of all things in dreams seem to dilute the actual structure of belief in obtaining such formulations of thought to thing. Mostly unobtainable for the majority of the nouveau wasted in offput hedge fund houses so stretched beyond the mere collapse of space in the perfected dreammachine vehicle. So are the dispossessed by way of the disillusioned masses. Who or what screwed with the belief and realization of "the dream"?

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  2. Good to hear from you Ja! In your uniquely circuitous manner, you have touched on the three basic elements of this theory, which steeps in the field of semiotics:
    1. There must be an icon present in a real setting. (DisneyWorld, icon of happiness, family harmony and fantasy in Orlando, Florida)
    2. The icon must be in a setting not usually associated with it by a specific community. (Homeless families living in close proximity to DisneyWorld)
    3. The artist juxtaposes this icon in the unusual setting intentionally to bring awareness of a need for cultural reform. (60 Minutes producers/writers produced this segment to bring awareness of the economical issues that families are currently enduring in Florida and other communities across the U.S.)

    Thank you for your fascinating comments, particularly, your reference to harmony, which I interpret as dissonance resolving to consonance.

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